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Autism / Neurodiversity - Resources For and About: Home

This guide provides recommended resources for research and services related to autism and neurodiversity.

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About This Guide

This guide was created to provide information about autism and neurodiversity, including links to related support, resources, legal help, and frequently asked questions (FAQ). Use the tabs above to navigate through the pages of this guide.
Autism 101

a simple neurodiversity-based explanation
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what is autism?

Autism is type of brain wiring (neurological type) that processes information differently than typical brains do.
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This means that autistic thought patterns, sensory perceptions, social interactions, language processing, and emotional regulation all develop differently than those of people who are not autistic.

Modern societies operate in ways that often disadvantage autistic people, which makes autism a developmental disability.

who is autistic?

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About 1-2% of the world’s population is autistic.
Many populations are under-diagnosed, but autistic people are everywhere!

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People of all ages are autistic.
Though people usually talk about autistic children, autistic adults need support too.

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Autistic people are found across all genders, races, and nationalities.
Boys are diagnosed more often than other genders, but that doesn’t mean they are more likely to be autistic.

Everyone is NOT a little autistic, but everyone is human, so we have lots in common!

©Erin Human, 2017
for more information, visit:
erinhuman.com
autisticfamilies.org
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Image by Erin Human.

April is Autism Acceptance Month

Awareness: suffering, cure, tragedy, afraid, desperate, burden, #LightUpBlue, missing, hopeless, deficits, epidemic, tsunami. Acceptance: inclusion, strengths, teach, respect, accommodations, help, community, support, love, #REDinstead.

CC3.0 image from wikiHow by MissLunaRose.